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Black Tupelo Trees

Black Tupelo Tree mature fall color

I am positive I’m not the only person who needs to go to Weight Watchers after this Thanksgiving weekend. lol phew, it was all delicious good food, but I’m as stuffed as that turkey was.

Anyway, I digress.

I’ve had a lot of customers asking for trees and shrubs in container sizes larger than 3-gallon, especially the Black Tupelo trees. The Black Tupelos are not easy trees to find, and they’re especially difficult to find in larger sizes. But all of my searching has paid off and I finally found a couple of really good suppliers who grow them in large containers. So I can now sell them in 3-gallon, 15-gallon, and 30-gallon sizes. Prices are $22, $110, and $230, respectively. Height difference is 3-5′ tall, 5-7′ tall, and 7-9′ tall, respectively. The biggest differences between the sizes is width, rootball size, and age of the tree. Keep in mind also that it has a growth rate of slow, less than 12″ per year, to medium, 12-24″ per year. Click here, Black Tupelo Tree, to go to its description page in the Boutique to learn more about it and to order.

So I’ll start getting more of the trees and shrubs in the 7-, 10-, 15-, and 30-gallon sizes. Let me know if you’re looking for a particular plant in a larger size and I’ll do my best to find it for you.

Happy diggin’ in the dirt!

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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New Plants!

Cassia splendida

Y’all. I picked up an order today from my native supplier. Oh man, wait till you see how pretty they all are! The Pavonia Rock Roses, Bidens ‘Pretty In Pink’, Cassia splendida, ‘Mary Gregory’ Stokesia, Raspberry Skullcap, Variegated Toad Lily, Ragin’ Cajun Red Ruellia, and Confederate Roses are all loaded down with buds and blooms.

The others I got are Black Tupelo trees, 1-gallon Common Persimmons, Dutch PIpevine, Red Maple tree, Red Spider/Surprise lily, 1-gallon Pawpaw trees, Walking Iris, Natchez Mock Orange, Witch Hazel, Frogfruit, and Peggy Martin Roses.

I’m making another trip back there probably Monday to get more 3-gallon trees because I have waiting lists a mile long for a lot of what’s out of stock in that size: Sassafras, Black Tupelo, Common Persimmons, Pawpaws, Chalk Maple, etc. Y’all keep buying them, and I’ll keep keeping them in stock!

Oh, on the Sassafras: I’m getting the last two that my supplier has in stock. He’s having a hard time finding seeds to start them, so I’m not sure when I’ll have more once these run out. I’ll also start looking for other suppliers who grow them, but I can’t promise anything.

I’m gonna post a video tomorrow to show y’all everything in all its glory. Be watching for it!

Happy diggin’ in the dirt.

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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Plant Pick Up Post for 11/04

Pavonia Rock Rose

As promised, here is the list of plants Ziva and I are picking up this Friday the 4th!

  • Lycorus radiata, Red Spider Lily (new)
  •  Cassia (I’m not sure which Cassia this will be. I’ll update this once I know.) (new)
  • Hibiscus mutabilis, Double Confederate Rose (new)
  • Philadelphus coronarius, Natchez Mock Orange (new)
  • *Acer rubrum, Red Maple (new)
  • *Diospyros virginiana, Common Persimmon
  • *Hammamelis virginiana, Witch Hazel (new)
  • *Nyssa sylvatica, Black Tupelo Tree
  • *Sassafras albidum, Sassafras Tree
  • *Bidens, “Pretty In Pink Bidens”
  • *Pavonia  lasiopetala, Rock Rose (new) pictured at top of page
  • *Phylla nodiflora, Frogfruit
  •  Ruellia elegans ‘Ragin’ Cajun’ (new)
  • Scuttellaria suffrutescens, Raspberry Skullcap
  • *Stokesia laevis ‘Mary Gregory’ (new)
  • Tricyrtis formosana, Variegated Toad Lily (new)
  • Aristalochia triloba, Dutchman’s Pipe Vine (new)

*Native/Nativar to Texas, Louisiana, or Southeast US. (new) means this is the first time it’s been for sale in the Boutique.

And now the pics showing what we’re getting in all their mature glory!

Happy diggin’ in the dirt!

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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Stunning Drift Roses

Peach Drift Rose

The Peach Drift Roses have decided to show off here lately. Look at that cluster of beautiful blooms! Fall and spring really are the perfect times of year for roses to do their thing and remind us why we love them so much.

I have Drift Roses in stock in 2-gallon containers for $25 each. They are 2-3′ tall and wide. The varieties I have are Red Drift, Peach Drift, Lemon Drift, and White Drift. Here’s the link to their page for more info: Drift Roses.

These really are very pretty roses. I love that they stay small, 2-5′ tall and wide depending on which variety, which makes them perfect for planting in containers, using the trailing varieties as groundcover towards the front of garden beds, as small hedges, or as medium-size specimen roses. They are very versatile, that’s for sure.

I haven’t fungicide sprayed them at all during our hot and humid summer, and all I noticed were a few leaves with blackspot. I picked those off and threw them away, and the roses just continued chugging out beautiful foliage and flowers. So, yeah, they really are very disease resistant roses.

I think you need some of these pretties in your garden. Go order yourself some!

Happy diggin’ in the dirt.

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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Black Tupelo Tree

Black Tupelo Tree fall color

I’m beginning to come to the conclusion that the Black Tupelo Tree is one of my very favorite large native trees. The more I read about it and see pics of it in both its summer glory and fall glory, I fall in love with it even further. I cannot wait till I have my own piece of property so I can plant my very own Black Tupelo Tree.

I updated the description on the Black Tupelo’s website page, and I think it’s time we revisit this stunningly beautiful tree. Enjoy!

Botanical Name:  Nyssa sylvatica

Common Name:  Tupelo, Blackgum, Black Tupelo, Sour Gum, Pepperidge, Tupelo Gum, Beetlebung

Description:  This is one of the most beautiful native Texas trees around. Summer leaves are a dark green with a high-gloss appearance, but the most spectacular part of this tree is the fall foliage with many shades of yellow, orange, bright red, purple, or scarlet that may appear on the same branch before dropping for the winter season. Bark matures to medium gray and resembles alligator hide. Bluish-black berries appear in August – October. Makes a strong specimen shade tree. Grows 30-50′ high, with a 20-30′ spread. This is a very versatile tree in where it grows: It prefers moist soils, but is adaptive and tolerates poorly-drained soils and standing water, some drought, and some dry soils, at least in the wild. It tolerates many different soil types including clay. The one thing it does need is acidic soil, which we have in this area. It has a lot of issues when grown in alkaline soils. Does fine in bog or pond areas as well as regular garden areas. Growth rate is slow to medium: anywhere from less than 12″ to 24″ per year. Is drought tolerant after established. Can grow in sun, part sun, or part shade.

The Black Tupelo supports lots of different wildlife, which is a huge reason we plant native. Its young sprouts are eaten by white-tailed deer. The berries are enjoyed by wild turkeys, black bear, foxes, raccoons, and possums from August through October. The natural hollows that form in the tree are a refuge for reptiles, tree frogs, bats, and other wildlife. It is one of the most important food sources for fall song bird migration. Birds that feed off Tupelo fruit include the American Robin, Swainson’s Thrush, Gray-cheeked Thrush, Hermit Thrush, Wood Thrush, Cardinal, Mockingbird, Blue Jay, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Flicker, Pileated Woodpecker, Eastern Phoebe, Brown Thrasher, Eastern Bluebird, European Starling, Scarlet Tanager, Catbird, Cedar Waxwing, and the  Crow.

It’s also the host plant for lots of moths:  Allotria elonympha (False Underwing), Antispila nysaefoliella (Tupelo Leafminer), Comachara cadburyi (Cadbury’s Mystique), Darapsa pholus (Azalea Sphinx), Malacosoma disstria (Forest Tent Caterpillar), Paectes ostoloides (Large Paectes), Polygrammate hebraeicum (The Hebrew), and Probole alienaria (Alien Probole).

It has special value to honey bees for the spring flowers’ nectar, which is where the highly prized Black Tupelo Honey comes from. Black Gum Tupelo honey has a light amber color and is very thick.

It has a flowering habit that is polygamodioecious, meaning that some plants have mostly male flowers while others have mostly female flowers, with most plants having a few perfect flowers. This would account for some plants being loaded with egg-shaped blue-black berries, while others may only have a few berries.

Like many trees, the Black Tupelo barely makes it into the edible realm. The pulp of its fruit is technically edible but extremely sour and extremely bitter, which is why it is usually used in sweetened preserves. Now you know where one of its common names, Sour Gum, comes from.

This plant in the 3-gallon containers is 3-5′ tall x 1-3′ wide, not including the container.

Interesting Tidbit:  The genus name, Nyssa, refers to mythical water nymphs, read a fondness for wet places. Nysa was a water nymph and nurse to Bacchus.  Sylvatia means of the woods (Black Tupelo);  Aquatica is living in water (Swamp Tupelo); Ogeche is from Ogeechee, which is Creek for “our mother” (Ogeechee Tupelo).

Hardiness Zones 4 – 9

Bottom line is if you have the room, this amazing native tree should be growing in your garden. Go to the Black Tupelo Tree page to order.

Happy diggin’ in the dirt!

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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Eastern Red Cedars and other stuff

Howdy howdy howdy. It’s a gloriously beautiful day here in East Texas, I hope everyone is getting out and enjoying it.

Well, we survived the mid-October freeze just fine. I brought inside the Dwarf Powderpuffs and the variegated Crinum Lilies because they were looking beautiful and I didn’t want them to start going dormant. One of the Crinum is putting out blooms, and it’s gorgeous! The Dwarf Powderpuffs are cold sensitive, so they’re becoming houseplants for the winter, which they actually make great houseplants if you have a sunny area for them and give them the humidity they need.

I’ve been wanting to get Eastern Red Cedars in stock, but all of my suppliers were out of the 3-gallon sizes. So I kept searching and finally found a supplier who has some available. I’m picking them up Wednesday, $20 each, about 2′ tall. This is a beautiful tree native to East Texas. I can also get them in 15-gallon size, 4-6′ tall, $100 each.

I’ve had a few customers ask if I’m staying open through the winter. My answer is yes I am! Because our ground doesn’t freeze we can garden basically year round, and the absolute best time to plant hardy trees, shrubs, and perennials is October through March. So I see no reason to close for the winter.

I hear ya wondering why that’s the best time to plant. The two reasons are the plants are either going dormant or are dormant during that time frame, so transplant shock happens less; and their energy goes to building a strong root system before the heat of the summer rolls back again.

Y’all. The mums are starting to look absolutely stunning. You need these on your porch or patio. Click Mums Page, to see sizes/prices and to order. I also have some in solid yellow and white with a yellow center.

The supplier I’m getting the Eastern Red Cedars from also has really cool ornamental flowering trees like Crabapples and weeping peach trees. I’m leaning towards getting the Crimson Weeping Peach tree this time because I love plants with the weeping habit. The Crabapple in the pic is Prairiefire. He also has crabapples in white and pink flowering. Which one do you like best??

Ziva trying to decide which tree she likes best.

Alrighty then. I need to go mow my grass. Cheers to everyone having a fabulous weekend.

Happy diggin’ in the dirt!

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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Pawpaw Trees, the Weather, and More

Maypop Passionvine

Well, Mother Nature heard us complaining about how hot it’s been, so she decided to send us cold weather. Notice I said “cold” not “cool.” Tuesday and Wednesday’s lows will be 30 and 33, respectively. Yep. cold. The problem with that is it’s a big drop in temps from what it’s been, so our plants haven’t been able to harden off enough for that degree of cold. If you still have houseplants outside, bring them in. If you have tender perennials, go ahead and cover them Tuesday afternoon with frost cloth, blankets, sheets, etc., so they don’t get too shocked by the cold. If you have anything that’s blooming and you want to save the blooms, cover those too. A lot of our plants do fine with the cold: fruit trees and shrubs, cool season annuals, etc, so no need to worry about those. Mother Nature is nice enough to also send us some rain today and tomorrow, so we thank her for that. However, if you don’t get rain, be sure to water your plants well before the cold comes in because well-hydrated plants can survive cold better than plants that are dry.

If you use plastic to cover your plants, be sure to not let the plastic touch the plants and be sure to take the plastic off asap the next morning. Here are the reasons for what I said: 1. If plastic is touching the leaves it will conduct the cold to the plants. Use stakes to hold the plastic above the plants. 2. The area under the plastic heats up very quickly once the sun rises and the temps get higher. If left on, your plants could die from getting too hot. Trust me, I have learned from experience on both of those issues.

Let me know if you have questions about what plants in your garden need to be covered.

Ok, Ziva and I are picking up more plants from our amazing native supplier dude on Monday. Here’s what we’re getting:

  • Pawpaw Trees!!! I’m getting them in 1-gallon and 3-gallon sizes.
  • Dogwood trees, 1-gallon size but they’re 2-3′ tall. These are the Cornus florida, white dogwoods.
  • Passiflora incarnata, the native Maypop passion vine. I’m very excited about this one cause it’s hard to find. This is a host plant for the Gulf Fritillary caterpillars. My supplier said that the caterpillars have been happily munching on the vines, so they’re kinda ragged. I’ll post pics of them so you can see what they look like. The pic at the top of this post shows a Maypop passion vine flower.
  • Echinacea purpurea, Eastern Purple Coneflower

Both the Pawpaw and Maypop have edible fruit. The Purple Coneflower is the species Echinacea that has wonderful healing and medicinal properties. The Dogwood is simply glorious in the spring. All of these plants are native to Texas and Louisiana.

Keep in mind that regardless of the upcoming couple of cold temp nights, this time of the year is perfect for planting trees, shrubs, and perennials.

Happy diggin’ in the dirt!

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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Mums, Sweet Alyssum, Ornamental Mustard, Croton!

Mums mustard white and purple sweet alyssum

I still have some beautiful mums in stock that will look gorgeous on your porch or patio. Quart sizes are $3.25, 8″ are $6.75, and 10″ are $14. The yellows and one of the Red Ryders are opening up nicely. The quart size Grapeberry Red are just starting to show their beautiful colors, as are the Purple and Yellow mums. The others are still budded up, which means you’ll get lots of color time from them.

Ready for these to go home with you?? Here’s the link to their page in the Boutique: Mums.

If you need to make a special order of certain colors/sizes let me know. Other than special orders, I won’t have more mums in stock this year.

I also have two crotons in 6.5″ containers, those gorgeous red-leafed ornamental mustards, white Sweet Alyssum in 4″ and quarts, and purple Sweet Alyssum in 4″ containers for sale.

Go on ahead and add some beautiful cool season plants to your garden!

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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Tuesday the 18th Fruity Plant Pick Up Post

Redskin Peach Tree

The fruit trees and shrubs will be here Tuesday the 18th! Here’s what we’re getting:

  • Fig Trees, 5-gallon size, $27: Celeste, LSU Purple
  • Apple Trees, 5-gallon size, $35: Fuji, Mollie’s Delicious
  • Muscadine Vines, 2-gallon size, $17.25: Carlos, Cowart
  • Peach Trees, 5-gallon size, $35: Redskin, Loring
  • Pear Trees, 5-gallon size, $35: Orient, Keiffer
  • Plum Trees, 5-gallon size, $35: Methley, Bruce
  • Blueberry Bushes, 1-gallon size, $11: Tifblue, Powder Blue, Climax, Austin

I’m limited on space in Bella’s garden area, so I got only two of all varieties except the pear and plum trees and I got one of each variety of those. But what that means is I get new stock more often, so the plants you buy are fresh and happy. I got only the varieties that will do well with the number of chill hours we get. And for the ones that need cross-pollination, I got the varieties that work well together. I’ll give you all that detailed info on each plant’s page in the Boutique.

Y’all, those prices are really, really good.

If you know you want to buy some, message, email, or text me before Tuesday, and I’ll hold them for you. jeanni@bellajardins.boutique, 903-418-6289.

Happy diggin’ in the dirt!

Jeanni and Ziva the Diva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here

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Fruit Trees, Dogwoods, etc

Apple Tree

Good morning!

Heads up, y’all. You’ve been asking for them, so next week I’m getting in fruit trees: apples, figs, pears, peach, etc.; dogwood trees, white and maybe pink; blueberry bushes; pecan trees, and some other cool plants. Will do a more detailed post after I finish the order.

Happy diggin’ in the dirt.

Jeanni and Ziva
Bella Jardins Boutique
Beautiful Gardens Begin Here